Vol. 3, 2018

Original research papers

Radioecology

ANALYSIS OF ACTIVITY CONCENTRATION OF NATURAL RADIONUCLIDES IN THE SOIL OF THE INSTITUTE OF APPLIED NUCLEAR PHYSICS IN ALBANIA AND THE ASSESSMENT OF ANNUAL EFFECTIVE DOSE

Manjola Shyti, Irma Bërdufi, Florinda Cfarku, Gerti Xhixha

Pages: 77–80

DOI: 10.21175/RadProc.2018.16

Terrestrial gamma radiation levels are significantly affected by the radionuclides that are present in the soil, which in turn can be used for the assessment of the terrestrial gamma dose rate. This study is important because the employees of this institute, in addition to professional exposure, will be familiar with the average annual effective dose equivalents (AEDEs) in soils that come from this area. The main radioactive materials are the long-lived radionuclides, such as 238U, 232Th and 40K, known as NORMs (Naturally Occurring Radionuclide Materials). Natural radioactivity analysis has been done for the soil samples collected from the area of the Institute of Applied Nuclear Physics (IANP) in Tirana, Albania. The activity concentration of Radium (226Ra), Thorium (232Th) and Potassium (40K) were measured in these samples using HPGe (High Purity Germanium) detector based on low background gamma-ray counting system. From the measured activity concentration of the above three natural radionuclides, the external gamma absorbed dose rate and the annual effective dose were calculated. The obtained mean values of gamma absorbed dose rate and annual effective dose in soil samples were found to be comparable with the worldwide average as reported by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. The natural radioactivity levels in soils of IANP area had never been studied before. This study aims to determine the dose rate in order to assess the health risks from the activity concentration of the natural radionuclides as 238U, 232Th and 40K in the soil. Also, the Radium equivalent (Raeq) of the samples is calculated and compared with the similar data reported in literature. The values of the outdoor annual effective dose were in the range of 0.02 to 0.11 mSv, showing that the area of IANP was radiologically safe.
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